shakshooka |شكشوكة

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nakedgeometry:

some recent lasercut wood pendants by naked geometry

nakedgeometry:

some recent lasercut wood pendants by naked geometry


Roberto Rizzo
ottoman-empire:

Bayram soluğu değsin diye: Osmanlı döneminde Mescid-i Nebevi’nin kandilleri yakılırken..

ottoman-empire:

Bayram soluğu değsin diye: Osmanlı döneminde Mescid-i Nebevi’nin kandilleri yakılırken..

labelleotero:

William Morris, 1892
Via The Metropolitan Museum of Art

labelleotero:

William Morris, 1892

Via The Metropolitan Museum of Art

(via ornaments-of-the-world)

ottomanhistorypodcast:

Fish With Human Face (Qazwini, Book of Marvels) on Flickr.For more, visit www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com
This image is from the Book of Marvels (عجايب المخلوقات وغرايب الموجودات) by Zakarīyā ibn Muḥammad Qazwīnī, a thirteenth century Arab geographer and scholar. The work is considered a very important example of a medieval Islamic cosmology and contains descriptions of the heavens and the earth, various angels, and many strange and not so strange creatures. 
The creature pictured here is somewhat like a mermaid, though a bit fishier than the eroticized Disney interpretation. According to the manuscript, it is called a “spotted fish” due to its characteristic spots. The fish comes onto the land at night to eat grass and jumps back into the sea with sunrise. Some say that it breathes fire from it nose and so burns the grass while it is eating. 
This particular manuscript dates to the 18th century and is written in Persian, likely from Mughal India. To view it and many others, check out Princeton’s digital collection of Islamic manusripts: pudl.princeton.edu/objects/h989r3272#page/127/mode/2up

ottomanhistorypodcast:

Fish With Human Face (Qazwini, Book of Marvels) on Flickr.

For more, visit www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com

This image is from the Book of Marvels (عجايب المخلوقات وغرايب الموجودات) by Zakarīyā ibn Muḥammad Qazwīnī, a thirteenth century Arab geographer and scholar. The work is considered a very important example of a medieval Islamic cosmology and contains descriptions of the heavens and the earth, various angels, and many strange and not so strange creatures.




The creature pictured here is somewhat like a mermaid, though a bit fishier than the eroticized Disney interpretation. According to the manuscript, it is called a “spotted fish” due to its characteristic spots. The fish comes onto the land at night to eat grass and jumps back into the sea with sunrise. Some say that it breathes fire from it nose and so burns the grass while it is eating.




This particular manuscript dates to the 18th century and is written in Persian, likely from Mughal India. To view it and many others, check out Princeton’s digital collection of Islamic manusripts: pudl.princeton.edu/objects/h989r3272#page/127/mode/2up

ottomanhistorypodcast:

Abdul Qadir al-Jazairi on Flickr.
For more, visit: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com Cairo. Abd-el-Kadir, c. 1860-1883 (Library of Congress). Abdelkader El Djezairi (عبد القادر ابن محي الدين الجزائري) was a notable from the Oran region of Algeria who rose to prominence through his defiance of the French invasion of Agleria, which he battled intermittently until he was arrested and exiled to France in 1848. He was eventually allowed to leave and traveled to the Ottoman Empire, first to Bursa and then settled in Damascus in 1855. During the massacres of Christians in the city in 1860, Abdelkader was one of the notables who guarded Christians and offered them refuge in his home. Western leaders applauded this act and in the years that followed he became somewhat of a celebrity and fascination of the European public, hence this photograph in which he is decorated with various medals. His family remained influential in Damascus politics, and he became a national symbol of resistance to French colonialism in Algeria.

ottomanhistorypodcast:

Abdul Qadir al-Jazairi on Flickr.

For more, visit: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com

Cairo. Abd-el-Kadir, c. 1860-1883 (Library of Congress). Abdelkader El Djezairi (عبد القادر ابن محي الدين الجزائري) was a notable from the Oran region of Algeria who rose to prominence through his defiance of the French invasion of Agleria, which he battled intermittently until he was arrested and exiled to France in 1848. He was eventually allowed to leave and traveled to the Ottoman Empire, first to Bursa and then settled in Damascus in 1855. During the massacres of Christians in the city in 1860, Abdelkader was one of the notables who guarded Christians and offered them refuge in his home. Western leaders applauded this act and in the years that followed he became somewhat of a celebrity and fascination of the European public, hence this photograph in which he is decorated with various medals. His family remained influential in Damascus politics, and he became a national symbol of resistance to French colonialism in Algeria.

artdetails:

Tughra (Official Signature) of Sultan Suleiman. Istanbul, Turkey. c. 1555-1560. Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper.

(via shaweesh)

divaneee:

Quran folio, surah al-Fatihah, 13th century AH/AD 19th century (Qajar), Iran. (via Pin von Mohammad Ashour auf „Islamic“ | Pinterest)

divaneee:

Quran folio, surah al-Fatihah, 13th century AH/AD 19th century (Qajar), Iran. (via Pin von Mohammad Ashour auf „Islamic“ | Pinterest)

(via ornaments-of-the-world)

isqineeha:

Give Me a Poem (2009) أعطني قصيدة
Iraqi Artist SADIK KWAISH ALFRAJI صادق كويش الفراجي

isqineeha:

Give Me a Poem (2009) أعطني قصيدة

Iraqi Artist SADIK KWAISH ALFRAJI صادق كويش الفراجي

(via thefishknows)